Book Jacket of the Week: Hyperfocus

Our Book Jacket of the Week is Chris Bailey’s Hyperfocus – out August 28th from Viking and available now for pre-order! Our focus has never been more scarce or at risk, so we love the jacket’s bold color scheme that says, “pay attention to this book.” We’re thrilled with how the lettering is slightly out of focus around the edges, but crystal clear in the center – much like the way Chris describes our attention. While the cover may be worthy of judging, it’s what’s inside that counts. Check out what others have to say on Hyperfocus:

Hyperfocus does a remarkable job of unpacking the realities, obstacles, and best practices of managing the subtle but ever-present world of our conscious attention. All of us can get better at how, when and on what we focus, this is an extraordinary, eye-opening, and research-based report of what affects us in this regard, and how to take advantage of this information to achieve greater satisfaction in our lives. Bravo, Chris.” – David Allen, author of Getting Things Done

Becoming more productive isn’t about time management; it’s about attention management. I’d tell you more about that, but I lost my train of thought. Luckily this attention-grabbing book is here to help. Chris Bailey offers actionable, data-driven insights for sharpening your focus – and finding the right moments to blur it.” – Adam Grant, author of Originals and Give and Take; coauthor of Option B with Sheryl Sandberg

“The best productivity plans call for strategy, not just hacks or tactics – and Hyperfocus gives you strategy in spades. When you read this book, get ready to do your most important work!” – Chris Guillebeau author of The $100 Startup, The Art of Non-Conformity, and The Happiness of Pursuit

“I read Hyperfocus on my phone…but this book was so engaging I stopped checking email entirely! I highly recommend this book to anyone looking to do more of what matters in a distracted world.” – Laura Vanderkam, author of What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast and 168 Hours

“Let me guess. You’re like me. You don’t have time to read this book. Or any book! Who has time for books anymore? Well, that’s perfect. Because it means you have the disease. And right now you’re holding the cure.” – Neil Pasricha, author of The Book of Awesome and The Happiness Equation

Chris Bailey ran a year-long productivity project where he conducted intensive research, as well as dozens of productivity experiments on himself, to discover how to become as productive as possible. He documents these experiments and more on his popular blog, A Life of Productivity. To date, Chris has written hundreds of articles on the subject, and has garnered coverage in media as divers as The New York Times, The Huffington Post, New York magazine, Harvard Business Review, TED, Fast Company, and Lifehacker. The author of The Productivity Project (Crown; 2016), translated into 11 languages, and Hyperfocus (Viking; August 28, 2018), launching in seven languages, Chris lives in Ottawa, Ontario.

Be sure to follow Chris on Twitter and purchase a copy of Hyperfocus, available wherever books are sold: Penguin Random House,  Barnes & Noble, Amazon!

Richard Cohen

"The highest compliment one can pay “How to Write Like Tolstoy” is that it provokes an overwhelming urge to read and write, to be in dialogue or even doomed competition with the greatest creative minds… That Mr. Cohen is an editor, that his love of literature comes in large part from awe in the presence of better writers than he, is no small matter. His love is infectious, and regardless of how well he ends up teaching us to write, that is miracle enough." — Stefan Beck, The Wall Street Journal

“An elegant, chatty how-to book on writing well, using the lessons of many of the world’s best writers . . . [Cohen] draws on plentiful advice from past and present literary titans. . . . The process of gathering advice from prominent contemporary authors such as Francine Prose, Jonathan Franzen, and Nick Hornby gives Cohen the opportunity to tell any number of amusing, often discursive stories about great literature and authors, mixed with the writers’ own observations.” — Publishers Weekly