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urlWe are thrilled to announce the launch of our new Speakers Bureau! Adding to our multi-pronged literary and marketing approach, our Speakers Bureau features distinct voices in literature who inspire audiences and facilitate progressive thought and conversation. Unlike traditional bureaus, our objective is to focus only on the work of authors and connect them with venues nationwide and globally. 

Our roster features leaders in productivity and leadership Chris Bailey and Rajeev Peshawaria, New York Times and internationally bestselling authors Nicola Kraus, Sam Wasson, and Douglas Kennedy, Olympian Ginny Gilder, award-winning neuroscientist Susan Peirce Thompson, and more. At Lucinda Literary, we take immense pride in connecting our authors to the broadest audiences possible, and are excited to explore the vast, uncharted territory we see in matching authors to venues.

We are currently seeking to expand our Speakers Bureau through the referrals of colleagues in publishing. We are not accepting unsolicited submissions at this time.

If you are interested in booking one of our speakers, visit: http://www.lucindaliterary.com/request-a-speaking-appearance/.

richardcohen

Our Book Jacket of The Week is Richard Cohen’s How To Write Like Tolstoy out this week from PenguinRandomHouse. We love the final cover art, which showcases an orange sketch of Leo Tolstoy sporting blue spectacles. We love the colors, we love the font, but most of all, we love the content inside! Apparently, we’re not the only ones.

“This book is a wry, critical friend to both writer and reader. It is filled with cogent examples and provoking statements. You will agree or quarrel with each page, and be a sharper writer and reader by the end.” – Hillary Mantel

“An elegant, chatty how-to book on writing well, using the lessons of many of the world’s best writers…” – Publishers Weekly

“Lush and instructive . . . [Cohen] is a generous tour guide through his literary world.” – Kirkus Reviews

These 12 essays are like 12 perfect university lectures on the craft of writing fiction... interesting, charming, and engaging.” – Library Journal.

Get a sneak peek beyond this lovely, colorful cover on LitHub. You can purchase How To Write Like Tolstoy here.

Richard Cohen is the former publishing director of Hutchinson and Hodder & Stoughton. Works that he has edited have gone on to win the Pulitzer, Booker, and Whitbread/Costa prizes, and more than twenty have been #1 bestsellers. The author of By the Sword, an award-winning history of swordplay, and Chasing the Sun, a wide-ranging narrative account of the star that gives us life, he was for two years program director of the Cheltenham Festival of Literature and for seven years a visiting professor in creative writing at the University of Kingston-upon-Thames.

Visit Richard’s website here or follow him on Twitter @aboutrichard or Facebook @RichardCohenAuthor.

imagesWe coupled up with superstar booker Ashley Bernardi, principal of Nardi Media, to talk about her work with authors and some lessons she’s gleaned from what really sells books to how authors can approach media themselves. (Though, we’ll be honest, it’s a heck of a lot easier with Ashley in your corner.) Here’s what she had to say.

1) What are the challenges authors face in getting booked on radio/television?

One of the main challenges that authors face is making the pitch relevant to the news cycle. We can overcome this challenge by using recent data, statistics, and research on the subject that was written about about to make the pitch buzzier and more relevant to the news cycle. Producers and reporters are fact-driven, so if we can present them with facts that tie in news of the day/week/month, and use the author and book as a jumping off point for a conversation about it — we usually see traction. I always try to use numbers, data, demographics, and more, to tie in a pitch. Sometimes the pitch is not just about the book itself – but where the author grew up, where he/she is based, and more. There is so much we can work with and that’s the best part about the process!

2) What can authors do to make themselves more attractive media candidates, and get a producer’s interest or attention? What are the most important “ingredients” to include in one’s pitch?

The approach to pitching radio and television varies, as well as the particular show you are pitching. Know who you are pitching and what the show has covered recently. Remember that a producer/reporter will do research on you, so it’s your job to do research on their show. What has been covered recently? Any pieces or segments that you liked or stood out to you? Is there a connection to your book or subject matter?

Another important factor is the pitch itself. You can and should specify and tailor a press advisory based off what a show covers. I usually never work with one generic press advisory. If you give a broad blanket advisory to every single national radio and television show, you won’t see results. But if you can tailor press advisories to specifically what a show covers (health, finance, etc), you’ll see results.

The most important ingredients to a broadcast pitch: Pre-existing video of the author(s) in an interview setting, street credibility (ie prior media placements in print, online, TV, radio), a pitch tailored specifically to what the show covers or has been covering, and making it newsworthy using recent statistics and data.

3) What kind of interviews are most effective? Does it always need to be a national media hit to cause an impact?
Obviously a national television or radio hit creates a big buzz and a wide range of exposure, but don’t discount the local radio stations, especially NPR affiliates. People who listen to NPR read books. I’ve had book authors do local interviews with NPR affiliates around the country, and they’ll see their book sales and Amazon ratings increase just from one radio interview alone.
There is also a huge added bonus to television and radio in today’s media world: online exposure. Nearly every television and radio segment now gets published online – which is a whole new audience reached!

Read more »

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December might entice those on the East Coast to kick into hibernation mode but we’ve been having an unusually warm winter season. Why not head out to hang with some of your favorite authors while giving back at the same time? Here’s a mini guide to some upcoming literary holiday parties in the city:

Wednesday, December 9th at 8pm
Riverhead Books Holiday Party 2015
The Brooklyn Brewery
79 N 11th St, Brooklyn

Join Riverhead Books family & friends in supporting Libraries Without Borders, providing books and Idea Boxes to Syrian Refugees. $15 gets you unlimited beer + baked goods by Riverhead authors + raffle prizes + Photo Booth with Booker Prize winner, Marlon James.

Wednesday, December 16th at 6:30pm
PEN “Freedom To Write” MINGLE
Solas (Upstairs at 232 East 9th Street)
FREE (but rsvp required by 12/14 at membership@pen.org)

If you aren’t a member of PEN American Center, I’d suggest taking a look at all the wonderful things they do for the literary world at home and abroad. From assisting imprisoned writers to celebrating some of the best works in literature with their numerous awards, the PEN crowd is a welcoming and caring bunch.
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howtobeagrownup

By Melissa X. Golebiowski

This book cover for bestselling authors Nicola Kraus & Emma McLauglin’s (authors of The Nanny Diaries) latest release, out today, How To Be A Grown Up, shows us what it’s like to walk in two shoes at once. The novel’s heroine, Rory McGovern, finds herself juggling both single parenthood and a full time career after her actor husband decides to walk and leave her solo.

Rory, newly in her forties, finds herself working for two twentysomethings at a luxury lifestyle site for kids, JeuneBug. (Of course, no one at the company but Rory has any children of their own.) Rory has her feet in two different worlds; will she fall flat on her face or come up with a successful game plan?

The cover shoes are reflective of two completely different styles but come with an interesting backstory.

The Chuck behind the Converse brand was Chuck Taylor, a high school basketball player who fell in love with Converse All Stars and became an extremely successful traveling salesmen of the shoe by specially selling them to high school and college basketball teams. With a successful athletic branding behind the shoe, Converse also became the official training shoe for the military during WWII.

Keeping with the theme of battle, high heels were actually a part of the 16th Century Persian soldier’s uniform. When riding horseback, the heels dug comfortably into the stirrups and enabled the warriors to stand up & shoot as they rode in to fight. The high heel was originally created for this purpose and gained popularity in many horse riding cultures. Women picked up the high heel habit in the 1600’s when they started adopting male fashion. Fast forward to the present and it’s a staple of female fashion today.

We have a feeling that with this kind of footwear in tow, Rory will come up a solid strategy to conquer the odds.

Read the New York Times Book Review
Say hi to Emma and Nicola.

It’s expensive to launch a “successful” book, whether the investment is the publisher’s, yours, or a combination of both. And by successful, I’m not even talking about New York Times bestsellers, whose successes seem as much the result of a quantifiable financial investment as they are the result of unquantifiable variables like reader enthusiasm and sheer serendipity. By successful, I’m referring to any book that earns out its publisher’s investment and sells through its first printing. Any author who’s gotten that far should be immensely proud.

Here are some of the most critical costs I’ve seen responsible for creating a successful book:

*Print run (the number of books printed)
*Co-op (exhibition or shelf space the publisher is buying, whether at Barnes and Noble or Amazon.com, to offer your book exposure to browsers. Involved explanation here.)
*Marketing & publicity (ranging from advertising to a freelance publicist)
*Buying back books (for events or giveaway/review purposes)

For authors who receive an advance in the tens of thousands of dollars, a robust first print run, co-op, or hefty publicity/events support isn’t likely. And even the rare, proactive publicist who works with you at your publishing house…his/her efforts may simply not translate. If your hope is to exceed expectations and give your book a real shot on the market, you will need to find ways to supplement what’s lacking in the publisher’s investment.

Here are some ways to properly prioritize your time and energy that won’t cost you a dime, excluding gas money.
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National work/family expert and speaker Scott Behson has penned a first book, The Working Dad’s Survival Guide: How to Succeed at Work and at Home with the intention to help out dads who feel as if providing for their families and being present fathers is an impossible task. While Scott recognizes that the burden of work and family falls heaviest on working women, he also realizes that working men generally receive less support from their peers and institutions. With his book, Scott hopes to aid fathers and raise awareness. The Working Dad’s Survival Guide is out from Motivational Press today and has already been met with open arms by fathers and the people who care about them – It’s currently Amazon’s #1 new release for career advice!

For a taste of the book, check out Scott’s articles covering topics ranging from saving money, to negotiating for workplace flexibility that will be useful for a new dad or any father who has been contending with his work and familial responsibilities (50% of working dads say that they struggle with work and family balance). Even those who feel like they can handle their responsibilities may find new insights from Scott’s articles and The Working Dad’s Survival Guide.

Scott has been an advocate for working fathers for numerous years, speaking at events such as the White House Summit on Working Families. We hope The Working Dad’s Survival Guide is the first step in a larger conversation concerning working dads.

By Cadeem Lalor

Bio: Scott Behson, PhD, is a Professor of Management at Fairleigh Dickinson University and a national expert in work and family issues. Scott also founded and runs the popular blog, Fathers, Work, and Family, dedicated to helping working fathers and encouraging more supportive workplaces. He writes regularly for the Harvard Business Review Online, Huffington Post and the Good Men Project, and has also written for Time and the Wall Street Journal. Scott has appeared on MSNBC, CBS This Morning, Fox News and Bloomberg Radio, as well as NPR’s Morning Edition, Radio Times, and All Things Considered. His book, The Working Dad’s Survival Guide: How to Succeed at Work and at Home, comes out today. Contact him @ScottBehson.

FDU headshot

 

Categorized: Uncategorized

We’re excited to announce that our friends at Full Fathom Five have launched a contest in celebration of author T.A. Maclagan’s new young adult spy thriller, They Call Me Alexandra Gastone, publishing May 20th!

Here is your chance to become an online sleuth and enter to win the grand prize of FOURTEEN books from eleven great young adult book authors.

All you have to do to be in to win is visit the website of each participating author and discover all 10 clues. Each author has hidden their clue in a two truths and a lie blog post. The numerical clue is somewhere within their “lie statement.” Some quick detective work (Hint: Check the author’s bio page) and you’ll be able to identify the lie and unlock the clue. Add the numerical clues from all 10 authors together and you’ll have the number code needed to unlock your rafflecopter entry!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

All details about the YA DASH can be found here.

Be sure to join the authors on twitter for some more truth or lie fun! Tweet your own truth of lie with the hashtags #yadash and #truthorlie. Can you catch the authors in their lies? Can they catch you in yours?

GOOD LUCK & HAPPY HUNTING!

Updated YA DASH for Facebook 2

Categorized: Uncategorized

Honey Girl 9781632204257 (1)

The cover of Lisa Freeman’s latest YA novel, HONEY GIRL, couldn’t be more spot on with this surf inspired theme. The book’s 15 year-old protagonist, Nani, is quickly showcased as a knowledgeable surfer despite the unspoken rule in post-Vietnam era Santa Monica that “girls don’t surf.” The wave on this cover is the beginning of a rip curl–the leading edge of a breaking wave. The colors capture the warmth and richness of the Hawaiian islands–where surfing was (and still is) the stuff of gods.

Lisa Freeman wasn’t the only author inspired by the island and it’s surfing culture:

“In one place we came upon a large company of naked natives, of both sexes and all ages, amusing themselves with the national pastime of surf-bathing.” – Mark Twain on visiting Hawaii

“Shaking the water from my eyes as I emerged from one wave and peered ahead to see what the next one looked like, I saw him tearing in on the back of it, standing upright on his board, carelessly poised, a young god bronzed with sunburn.” – Jack London on surfing lessons with George Freeth

In 1907, the same year that London experienced the water sport, Freeth made his way over to the mainland (California) and brought his surfing skills along for the ride.

How to survive California’s hottest surf spot: Never go anywhere without a bathing suit. Never cut your hair. Never let them see you panic.

The year is 1972. Fifteen-year-old Haunani “Nani” Grace Nuuhiwa is transplanted from her home in Hawaii to Santa Monica, California after her father’s fatal heart attack. Now the proverbial fish-out-of-water, Nani struggles to adjust to her new life with her alcoholic white (haole) mother and the lineup of mean girls who rule State Beach.

Following “The Rules”—an unspoken list of dos and don’ts—Nani makes contact with Rox, the leader of the lineup. Through a harrowing series of initiations, Nani not only gets accepted into the lineup, she gains the attention of surf god, Nigel McBride. But maintaining stardom is harder than achieving it. Nani is keeping several secrets that, if revealed, could ruin everything she’s worked so hard to achieve. Secret #1: She’s stolen her dad’s ashes and hidden them from her mom. Secret #2: In order to get in with Rox and her crew, she spied on them and now knows far more than they could ever let her get away with. And most deadly of all, Secret #3: She likes girls, and may very well be in love with Rox.

Enter to win one of five free signed copies of HONEY GIRL here!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

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Categorized: Authors and Writers

Presentation at Lucinda Literary/ WeWork's offices - Fulton Center.

On Thursday evening, we hosted a presentation on publishing for The Fresh Air Fund’s job shadowing program. Fresh Air is an amazing organization founded in 1877 with the simple intention to give inner city kids the experience of “fresh air”–at summer camps far from the streets of New York. Since then, it has become more like a family, offering children and their parents all kinds of educational resources throughout the year, and closely monitoring kids to ensure they stay on course to graduate college.

As part of the presentation, we created the short quiz below to discover which job in publishing was best suited to their personality traits. Take it yourself, or share it with young people curious about publishing careers, and tell us below the post how accurate you found your results.

What Job in Publishing is Right for You?

Choose just one answer for every question.

Choose the best quality combination to describe your personality from those below:

  1. Dreamy/Creative
  2. Thoughtful/Introverted
  3. Articulate/Passionate
  4. Talkative/Social

When you were little you wanted to be or were most drawn to the careers of:

  1. Artists
  2. Teachers or doctors
  3. Lawyers or CEOs
  4. Singers or Actors

You often find yourself:

  1. In your own world: observing people and imagining their lives
  2. Reading and helping friends with their schoolwork
  3. Socializing with other people, where you are often the storyteller of the group
  4. Browsing the internet, watching television and movies, communicating with friends

What interests you most in a career is:

  1. To leave something important behind for generations to come–a legacy
  2. To help others
  3. Learning about business and making money
  4. Working in a fun, fast-paced, social environment

You feel happy and stimulated when:

  1. Expressing yourself
  2. Giving feedback to others
  3. Helping others solve problems
  4. Positive feedback and rewards

You feel [fill in the blank] way about money:

  1. It doesn’t really interest you beyond the minimum you need to live your life
  2. You’d like to make a good living
  3. Making money is very important
  4. It’s more important to have a fun and fulfilling job than to make money

You feel [fill in the blank] about rejection:

  1. It hurts, but it won’t ever stop you from putting yourself out there.
  2. You find you’re able to make a rejection when necessary in a polite way.
  3. You can deal with it.
  4. It’s the worst thing ever.

It doesn’t bother you to:

  1. Be alone for hours in the day
  2. Do detail oriented work. You like the feeling of progress!
  3. Discuss or deal with money
  4. Talk to strangers. You can always find things in common with people!

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Mostly 1’s? Your personality is well-suited to be a writer.

Author

You are imaginative, creative, like to observe others, and are happy being in your own world—which is essential for all the hours you’ll need to spend writing if you have a career as an author!

 

 

Mostly 2’s? You could be a book editor!

Editing an English language document

You really thrive helping others (as you would be helping writers), and you have a natural strength for long, detail-oriented work, which will be necessary for all the manuscripts you’ll be editing.

 

Mostly 3’s? The best role for you in the publishing industry could be as a literary agent.

Lit Agent

Like editors, you enjoy helping people, and like publicists, you are social creatures, but your passion for business differentiates you from the rest of the pack.

 

 

Mostly 4’s? Book publicity would be a great career for you.

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You love people, entertainment, and pop culture and are always in the know about news and trends. Working in a fast-paced environment and booking media for authors will bring you joy and immediate satisfaction.