Archives: #BookJacketoftheWeek

richardcohen

Our Book Jacket of The Week is Richard Cohen’s How To Write Like Tolstoy out this week from PenguinRandomHouse. We love the final cover art, which showcases an orange sketch of Leo Tolstoy sporting blue spectacles. We love the colors, we love the font, but most of all, we love the content inside! Apparently, we’re not the only ones.

“This book is a wry, critical friend to both writer and reader. It is filled with cogent examples and provoking statements. You will agree or quarrel with each page, and be a sharper writer and reader by the end.” – Hillary Mantel

“An elegant, chatty how-to book on writing well, using the lessons of many of the world’s best writers…” – Publishers Weekly

“Lush and instructive . . . [Cohen] is a generous tour guide through his literary world.” – Kirkus Reviews

These 12 essays are like 12 perfect university lectures on the craft of writing fiction... interesting, charming, and engaging.” – Library Journal.

Get a sneak peek beyond this lovely, colorful cover on LitHub. You can purchase How To Write Like Tolstoy here.

Richard Cohen is the former publishing director of Hutchinson and Hodder & Stoughton. Works that he has edited have gone on to win the Pulitzer, Booker, and Whitbread/Costa prizes, and more than twenty have been #1 bestsellers. The author of By the Sword, an award-winning history of swordplay, and Chasing the Sun, a wide-ranging narrative account of the star that gives us life, he was for two years program director of the Cheltenham Festival of Literature and for seven years a visiting professor in creative writing at the University of Kingston-upon-Thames.

Visit Richard’s website here or follow him on Twitter @aboutrichard or Facebook @RichardCohenAuthor.

 

howtobeagrownup

By Melissa X. Golebiowski

This book cover for bestselling authors Nicola Kraus & Emma McLauglin’s (authors of The Nanny Diaries) latest release, out today, How To Be A Grown Up, shows us what it’s like to walk in two shoes at once. The novel’s heroine, Rory McGovern, finds herself juggling both single parenthood and a full time career after her actor husband decides to walk and leave her solo.

Rory, newly in her forties, finds herself working for two twentysomethings at a luxury lifestyle site for kids, JeuneBug. (Of course, no one at the company but Rory has any children of their own.) Rory has her feet in two different worlds; will she fall flat on her face or come up with a successful game plan?

The cover shoes are reflective of two completely different styles but come with an interesting backstory.

The Chuck behind the Converse brand was Chuck Taylor, a high school basketball player who fell in love with Converse All Stars and became an extremely successful traveling salesmen of the shoe by specially selling them to high school and college basketball teams. With a successful athletic branding behind the shoe, Converse also became the official training shoe for the military during WWII.

Keeping with the theme of battle, high heels were actually a part of the 16th Century Persian soldier’s uniform. When riding horseback, the heels dug comfortably into the stirrups and enabled the warriors to stand up & shoot as they rode in to fight. The high heel was originally created for this purpose and gained popularity in many horse riding cultures. Women picked up the high heel habit in the 1600’s when they started adopting male fashion. Fast forward to the present and it’s a staple of female fashion today.

We have a feeling that with this kind of footwear in tow, Rory will come up a solid strategy to conquer the odds.

Read the New York Times Book Review
Say hi to Emma and Nicola.

Honey Girl 9781632204257 (1)

The cover of Lisa Freeman’s latest YA novel, HONEY GIRL, couldn’t be more spot on with this surf inspired theme. The book’s 15 year-old protagonist, Nani, is quickly showcased as a knowledgeable surfer despite the unspoken rule in post-Vietnam era Santa Monica that “girls don’t surf.” The wave on this cover is the beginning of a rip curl–the leading edge of a breaking wave. The colors capture the warmth and richness of the Hawaiian islands–where surfing was (and still is) the stuff of gods.

Lisa Freeman wasn’t the only author inspired by the island and it’s surfing culture:

“In one place we came upon a large company of naked natives, of both sexes and all ages, amusing themselves with the national pastime of surf-bathing.” – Mark Twain on visiting Hawaii

“Shaking the water from my eyes as I emerged from one wave and peered ahead to see what the next one looked like, I saw him tearing in on the back of it, standing upright on his board, carelessly poised, a young god bronzed with sunburn.” – Jack London on surfing lessons with George Freeth

In 1907, the same year that London experienced the water sport, Freeth made his way over to the mainland (California) and brought his surfing skills along for the ride.

How to survive California’s hottest surf spot: Never go anywhere without a bathing suit. Never cut your hair. Never let them see you panic.

The year is 1972. Fifteen-year-old Haunani “Nani” Grace Nuuhiwa is transplanted from her home in Hawaii to Santa Monica, California after her father’s fatal heart attack. Now the proverbial fish-out-of-water, Nani struggles to adjust to her new life with her alcoholic white (haole) mother and the lineup of mean girls who rule State Beach.

Following “The Rules”—an unspoken list of dos and don’ts—Nani makes contact with Rox, the leader of the lineup. Through a harrowing series of initiations, Nani not only gets accepted into the lineup, she gains the attention of surf god, Nigel McBride. But maintaining stardom is harder than achieving it. Nani is keeping several secrets that, if revealed, could ruin everything she’s worked so hard to achieve. Secret #1: She’s stolen her dad’s ashes and hidden them from her mom. Secret #2: In order to get in with Rox and her crew, she spied on them and now knows far more than they could ever let her get away with. And most deadly of all, Secret #3: She likes girls, and may very well be in love with Rox.

Enter to win one of five free signed copies of HONEY GIRL here!

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Categorized: Authors and Writers

Did you know The Washington Post has its own eBook series published by Diversion Books?

I didn’t, until this superbly succinct page-turner came my way. At just over 100 pages, Steven Levingston, the Post’s nonfiction editor, describes in equally devastating and uplifting detail, a moment in the life of JFK that forever changed him.

Of course, the book is for you to read, but in the meantime, let’s just relish this gorgeous cover. It really says it all, doesn’t it?

TWP epub cover-Kennedy-FINAL

About the Book

A sensitive portrait of how a profound tragedy changed one of America’s most prominent families.

On August 7, 1963, heavily pregnant Jackie Kennedy collapsed, marking the beginning of a harrowing day and a half. The doctors and family went into full emergency mode, including a helicopter ride to a hospital, a scramble by the President to join her from the White House, and a C-section to deliver a baby boy, Patrick Bouvier Kennedy, five and a half weeks early with a severe respiratory ailment. The baby was so frail he was immediately baptized.
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ON SHELVES NOW

OK, this jacket is stunning. Indisputably stunning. You may have seen it, standing out among the crowd of books at Barnes & Noble or your local indie–stark and no-nonsense, just like its story.

For lovers of Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, for lovers of dystopian fiction, adventure novels, and the wild outdoors, journalist turned novelist (not easy to do), Peter Heller’s THE DOG STARS, is a book you won’t want to miss if you plan to be part of a national literary conversation. Read more »

ON SHELVES NOW

Nichole isn’t just a lovely and generous person – she runs Beyond the Margins, a great books community and promotional avenue for fellow writers – she’s also the author of this novel, which on the basis of the jacket alone, made us want to run to the beach with it. That is, if a beach were anywhere in the cards for this August.

Just know that it’s not purely a “beach read,” but smarter and more literary, with more depth, that lovers of Claire Messud (whose Emperor’s Children was also set against a post 9-11 backdrop) to Allison Winn Scotch will enjoy. Maybe even a little Elizabeth Strout inspired. Here’s a short synopsis:

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ON SALE TODAY

How long have women been waiting for a substantive book on fashion? And why is it so many of us women are obsessed, to the bewilderment of men, by one particular accessory?

In her first book on shelves today: Women From the Ankle Down: The Story of Shoes and How They Define Us (Harper), new author and rising star, Rachelle Bergstein, Read more »

ON SHELVES IN PAPERBACK THIS WEEK

I’m excited to get acquainted with the Hannah Vogel series, not merely because of its captivating book jacket and intriguing plot – I don’t usually read mystery – but because the author appears to be one of those genuine, real however successful, people one comes across only so often  in the virtual world. I’ve also recently noticed good female mystery authors – save the Sue Graftons and Janet Evanoviches of the world are particularly hard to find. (See this interesting article by Meg Wolitzer in The Times: “On the Rules of Literary Fiction for Men and Women.”)
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Amy is an ambitious and cool young editor who edits lifestyle, pop culture and celebrity books for Atria, an imprint of Simon & Schuster. I love everything Amy does, because her books are diverse as they are original. Naturally, I was excited when she “tapped” me on this original, if quirky, book just out this week, from new author Vicki Riordan, made for the hidden tap dance enthusiasts among us. I didn’t even know I was one, but I’m looking forward to reading it, and not merely because the jacket grabbed me. Glancing at the book art alone, I’m transported to my inner Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, back in the days when the performance arts mandated talented singing as well as tap dancing (if you can believe it). Voila, the jacket, and some nice praise Riordan has already picked up below:

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The latest book by Arthur Phillips, next on my reading list, and in his usual, ambitious style:

Most reading this blog are likely already aware of this book, and have maybe even bought it? For those who aren’t familiar, I encourage you to look no further than the book’s summary:

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